2. The Jewish Hospital
4. The House of Cukier

[The Prison]

We go to Piłsudski Street. On our left, we pass the prison.

The year in which Anna began writing her diary, marked the 70th anniversary of the prison building in Siedlce, which was constructed between 1841 and 1844 according to the design of architect Henryk Marconi.

Originally, the prison was located outside the city, in a three-storey building with four corner towers and surrounded by outbuildings and trenches. In subsequent years, the building was expanded. Modernization was completed in 1892 with a high wall featuring corner towers that enclosed the prison.

The prison was built in an American style with 117 cells. Prior to this, people sentenced by the District Court were kept imprisoned in the Bernardine Monastery located in Łuków. In 1887, the Our Lady of Kazan, an Eastern Orthodox chapel was built for the Orthodox warders and prisoners. It was located in the building at the present Piłsudski Street. Jewish prisoners held their devotions in the factory hall and were able to prepare their meals according to the dictates of their religion.

Russians imprisoned here, among others, Pantaleon Potocki, the commander of the 1846 uprising and Władysław Rawicz, a civilian commander-in-chief of the Podlasie province in 1863. At the end of the First World War, Germans detained here conspirators of the Polish Military Organization and its commander Władysław Horyd.

Anna mentions the prison building several times. Among the prisoners was Anna’s friend, Towia. On November 2, 1915, German occupation authorities issued an order that called for all men aged 21 to register. After checking the list, all of them were released with order to appear on Sunday. However, nineteen men came too late, after checking the attendance list, for which they were incarcerated in prison. Towia was one of them. Occupiers gave the possibility of changing the penalty to a fine; hence, it was suspected that the Germans were more interested in money than in the appointment of recruits.

We pass the prison and go down Piłsudski Street. We continue our tour following the odd side of the street, in those days called Warszawska Street.

2. The Jewish Hospital
4. The House of Cukier
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